Legislative Bulletins

H.R. 1388—Generations Invigorating Volunteerism and Education (GIVE) Act

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Washington, Mar 18, 2009 | comments

 

 

Legislative Bulletin………….………………March 18, 2009

 

Contents:

                H.R. 1388—Generations Invigorating Volunteerism and Education (GIVE) Act

 

 

Key Conservative Concerns

Take-Away Points

 

--H.R. 1388 expands the scope of a number of programs including AmeriCorps, Learn and Serve, and the National Civilian Community Corps.  While no CBO score is available for the overall bill, last year’s bill which was similar to H.R. 1388, authorized $6.2 billion in spending for volunteer programs. 

 

-- H.R. 1388 stretches the definition of a volunteer by paying them for their service, frequently providing volunteers with health benefits, housing, and other items that undermine the definition of a volunteer.

 

--H.R. 1388 funds AmeriCorps at a level of “such sums may be necessary.” AmeriCorps has funded programs in the past such as Planned Parenthood of Western Washington and the Los Angeles Gay and Lesbian Center (LAGLC).  In addition, they ran a program that gave $5 to children for each toy gun they brought in.

 

--H.R. 1388 funds Learn and Serve, which has been described as “Not Performing: Results Not Demonstrated” by the Office of Management and Budget’s website, ExpectMore.gov.  It also funds AmeriCorps National Civilian Community Corps which OMB describes as “Not Performing: Ineffective.”  During a time of economic crisis, we should not be funding programs that have shown little or no results.

 

For more details on these concerns, see below.

 

H.R. 1388—Generations Invigorating Volunteerism and Education (GIVE) Act (McCarthy, D-NY)

 

 

Order of Business:  H.R. 1388 is scheduled to be considered Wednesday, March 18, 2009, subject to a structured rule (H.Res. 250) that waives all points of order against consideration of the bill except for clause 9 of Rule XXI (earmarks) and clause 10 of Rule XXI (PAYGO) and makes in order the 11 amendments listed below.  All amendments are debatable for 10 minutes, except for the Manager’s Amendment, which is debatable for 30 minutes.      

 

Background: In the 110th Congress, H.R. 2857 came to the House floor on March 6, 2008.  The bill was pulled from the floor due to the Republican Motion to Recommit which would have required background checks for participants in the national service programs and would have prohibited sex offenders from serving in some prisons.  The bill was brought up under suspension on March 12, 2008 as H.R. 5563.  The bill included the Republican Motion to Recommit in the text.  The language is also included in H.R. 1388.  Many RSC Members voted against the bill last year.  To see how your boss voted, click here.

 

Summary:  H.R. 1388 would amend the National and Community Service Act of 1990 (NCSA) and the Domestic Volunteer Service Act of 1973 (DVSA) to revise their programs and reauthorize their appropriations through FY2014.  The NCSA authorizes Learn and Serve, AmeriCorps, the National Civilian Community Corps, and the Points of Light Foundation (which is not reauthorized in this bill).  The DVSA authorizes the Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA) and the National Senior Volunteer Corps.  The authorizations for these programs expired at the end of FY1996.  They are, however, funded in appropriations bills each year.

 

All of the programs authorized under these statutes are administered by an independent federal agency, the Corporation for National and Community Service (referred to in this document at “the Corporation”).

 

Title I—Amendments to the National Community Service Act of 1990

 

Definitions

    

  •   Disadvantaged Youth—includes those youth who are economically disadvantaged and one or more of the following: are out-of-school, including out-of-school youth who are unemployed; are in or aging out of foster care; have limited English proficiency; are homeless or who have run away from home; are at-risk to leave school without a diploma; and are former juvenile offenders or at risk of delinquency.  

 

General Provisions

  •       The bill adds new purposes related to service learning opportunities to improve education of children and youth, emergency and disaster relief and recovery, and increased service opportunities for the retired population. 
  •       H.R. 1388 includes a Sense of Congress that states: It is the sense of Congress that the number of participants in the programs authorized under subtitle C, including the Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA) and the National Civilian Community Corps (NCCC), should grow to reach 250,000 participants by 2014.  This includes AmeriCorps.  See Conservative Concerns below on AmeriCorps.

 

Learn and Serve America

According to ExpectMore.gov (a website developed by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget to rate federal programs) this program is intended to support and promote “service-learning.”  It awards grants to community organizations and education institutions that implement or promote service-learning programs to increase the likelihood that student participants will become more civically engaged and volunteer more in their communities.

 

The bill restructures the funding under this program so that 60 percent of the funds go towards elementary and secondary students; 25 percent go toward higher education programs; and 15 percent goes toward innovative and demonstration service-learning programs.  Under current law, the breakdown is 63.75% for elementary and secondary students; 11.25 percent for community-based programs for school-age youth (replaced with the innovative and demonstration service-learning programs in this bill); and 35 percent for higher education programs.  Each of the programs in the new bill are outlined below.

 

School-based Programs for Elementary and Secondary Students

  •       The bill requires that the Corporation reserve between two and three percent of funds for Indian Tribes and Territories. 
  •       Changes the current competitive and formula grant into a formula where fifty percent would be based on the number of school-age youth in the State, and fifty percent would be based on the allocation that the State receives under title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.
  •       H.R. 1388 increases the cap on the percentage of funds that can be used for administrative purposes from five to six percent. 

 

Higher Education Programs

  •       The bill encourages service learning as part of the teacher education, health professionals, criminal justice, and public policy curriculum. 
  •       The bill requires the Corporation to provide special consideration to applications submitted by Historically Black colleges and universities, Hispanic-serving institutions, and Tribal colleges and universities. 
  •       H.R. 1388 creates the Campuses of Service Program where the Corporation would designate up to 25 institutions of higher education as Campuses of Service.  They would be charged with encouraging student to pursue public service careers.

 

Innovative Service-Learning Programs and Research

  •       The bill replaces the current community-based program with competitive grants to state educational agencies, Territories, Indian tribes, colleges and universities, and nonprofit organizations for programs related to: science; technology; engineering; math; energy conservation; emergency and disaster preparedness; improving access to technology in low-income communities; mentoring programs; and research into service-learning. 
  •       Funds in this program may be used for programs related to science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), energy conservation, emergency and disaster preparedness, improving access to technology in low-income communities, mentoring, and more.
  •       Allows funds to be used for “Youth Engagement Zones,” which is a partnership of community organizations and a local educational agency, State Commission, or State education agency to address the needs of out-of-school youth.
  •       The bill requires that the Corporation conduct an independent evaluation of the program.
  •       The bill creates a new authority for grantees to operate “summer of service” programs that would provide service opportunities for students in grades 6 through 12.  In addition, the bill would allow students who complete at least 100 hours of service in such a program to be eligible for a summer of service education award of up to $500, with economically disadvantaged students being eligible for an education award up to $1000. 

 

Authorization of Appropriations for Learn and Serve

     

  • H.R. 1388 would authorize $97 million for the program in FY2010.  Such sums as may be necessary would be authorized for FY2010-FY2014.

 

AmeriCorps

  •       The bill would prohibit the Corporation from providing grants to federal agencies.
  •       The bill increases the cap on administrative costs from five percent to six percent.
  •       According to the House Republican Education and Labor Committee Staff, the bill “incorporates language requested by the Corporation and included in the Subcommittee reported FY 2008 Labor, HHS, and Education appropriations bills to law, grantees must provide at least 15 percent of the costs of living allowances provided to participants, and at least 25 percent of the costs of operating a program.  The bill creates one non-Federal match requirement of 24 percent during the first three years and increasing to 50 percent by the tenth year.”
  •       The bill creates four new Corps within AmeriCorps (Education Corps, Healthy Future Corps, Clean Energy Corps, and Veterans Corps).
  •       Includes an amendment from the 110th Congress by RSC Chairman Tom Price (R-GA) to require the Corporation to establish requirements for grantees to promote citizenship and civic engagement consistent with the principles contained in programs administered by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. 
  •       H.R. 1388 requires a full-time AmeriCorps participant to participate for one year (not nine months like before) and requires part-timers to meet a minimum 900 hour requirement over two years.
  •       The bill increases the range for administrative grants to state commissions from between $125,000 and $750,000 to between $200,000 and $825,000.
  •       The bill alters the funding allocations between the state formula, state competitive, and national direct pots.  According to the Committee, “State competitive and national direct pots were combined and allotted up to 62.7 percent of the appropriation and 35.3 percent of the allotment was reserved for state formula grants.”  1 percent would be reserved for Indian tribes and 1 percent for U.S. Territories.
  •       The bill also expands the authority of the “education award program” where the federal government pays only the education award and a fixed amount of $600 (or $800 if at least 50 percent of the participants are disadvantaged youth) for the administrative support of a member. 

 

Authorization of Appropriations for AmeriCorps

     

  • H.R. 1388 authorizes such sums as may be necessary for AmeriCorps for FY2010-FY2014.  The program received an appropriation of $271.2 million in FY2009.

 

National Service Trust

According to ExpectMore.gov, this program is meant to engage Americans in service to address unmet community needs in areas such as education, public safety, health, and the environment.  AmeriCorps provides grants to a wide variety of organizations to serve communities in addressing local needs.

  •       The bill increases the amount of the education award from $4,725 to the maximum amount of a Pell Grant for that year.  For 2009-2010 it would be $5,350.
  •       States that the Summer of Service education award recipient has ten years to use the award, not seven.
  •       H.R.1388 also expands the types of student loans that can be repaid with the education award.
  •       Requires the Corporation to annually report on the number and percentage of veterans serving in national service positions and outline a strategy for getting more veterans to serve.

 

Authorization of Appropriations for National Service Trust

     

  • H.R. 1388 authorizes such sums as may be necessary for the National Service Trust for FY2010-FY2014.  The FY2009 funding level was $131.1 million.

 

National Civilian Community Corps (NCCC)

According to ExpectMore.gov, this program is a residential community service program for young adults age 18-24, the purpose of which is to promote civic engagement.  Members serve disaster preparedness and response needs across the country.  This program is scored as ineffective according to the U.S. Office of Management and Budget. 

  •       The bill rewrites the purpose of this program to include: natural and other disasters; infrastructure improvement; environmental stewardship and conservation; energy conservation; and urban and rural development.
  •       Increases the minimum age of participants to 18.
  •       The bill requires that at least 50 percent of participants are disadvantaged youths.
  •       The bill requires a feasibility study for the creation of a new campus.

 

Authorization of Appropriations for NCCC:  Under H.R.1388, the NCCC would be authorized at $35 million for FY 2010 and such sums as may be necessary for FY 2011 through 2014.  The FY2009 appropriation was $27.5 million.

 

Administrative Provisions

  •       The bill would prohibit programs from receiving assistance under the national service laws for the sole purpose of referring individuals to federal assistance programs or state assistance programs (funded in part by the federal government).
  •       Requires the corporation to evaluate the programs receiving funding under the national service laws and develop performance measures for each grantee.
  •       The bill would provide the Corporation the authority to withhold one percent of their funds to put toward accountability activities.
  •       The bill also requires that the program consolidate duplicative programs, terminate assistance to programs that do not meet performance measures, and set sustainability goals in order to address the ineffectiveness of the program. 
  •       The bill sets the per person cost of programs at $17,000, with a waiver available up to $19,500 if the Corporation determines the program has a “compelling reason.”
  •       Incorporates the Republican MTR from the 110th Congress which would require organizations receiving grants under the national service laws to run criminal background checks on individuals receiving these funds.  Prohibits those who refuse a background check eligibility for those programs.

 

Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS)

According to their website, “The Corporation is the nation’s largest grantmaker supporting service and volunteering.  Through our Senior Corps, AmeriCorps, and Learn and Serve America programs, we provide opportunities for Americans of all ages and backgrounds to express their patriotism while addressing critical community needs.”

  •       The bill eliminates the National Office of Outreach and Recruitment within the Corporation that was in the 110th Congress bill but incorporates some of the office’s duties into the duties of the CEO of the Corporation.
  •       In addition, the bill authorizes a new pilot program and study on displaced workers and how national service programs can be better geared towards helping them. Once the study is complete a pilot program must be created.
  •       The bill requires the Corporation to produce a plan for gaining 50 percent full-time national service positions by 2012.

 

Authorization of Appropriations

     

  • H.R. 1388 would authorize such sums as may be necessary for FY 2010-2014.  Based on funding provided for other pilot programs, CBO estimated in the 110th Congress, that authorizations for that program would total $5 million in FY 2008 and $26 million from FY 2008 through 2012.

 

Investment for Quality and Innovation, Subtitle H

  •       H.R. 1388 creates a Call to Service & September 11th Day of Service.
  •       Provides opportunities for those over 55 to participate in the Silver Scholarships and Encore Fellowships. 
  •       Creates a program (under current authorization) that focuses on disadvantaged youth, 21st century learning and thinking skills, youth under 17, health and wellness, court-involved youth and adults, and citizens over 55 interested in national service.
  •       Creates a Social Innovation Fund that would recognize and increase the impact of social entrepreneurs in tacking local and national challenges.  The Corporation would award five year grants between $1 million and $10 million per year to existing grantmaking institutions or partnerships between them and another institution, state commission, or local government.  

Authorization of Appropriations for the Investment for Quality and Innovation

     

  • H.R. 1388 would authorize such sums as may be necessary for FY 2010-2014.  The FY2009 appropriation was $18.9 million.

 

Training and Technical Assistance

     

  • H.R. 1388 creates a new subtitle requiring the Corporation to provide training and technical assistance to programs receiving assistance under national service laws.

 

Repeal of Title III

    

  •   H.R. 1388 repeals the Points of Light Foundation.

 

Title II—Domestic Volunteer Service Act of 1973

 

H.R. 1388 also would amend and reauthorize programs under the Domestic Volunteer

Service Act of 1973, including Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA) and volunteer programs aimed at engaging senior citizens in service activities. 

 

Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA)

According to ExpectMore.gov, this program “supports efforts to alleviate poverty by placing volunteers in communities for 12 months of full-time intensive service.  These volunteers strengthen local organizations that serve low-income communities, encourage local volunteer service, and generate the commitment of private sector resources.”

  •       The bill includes a number of new projects for participants to serve in, including: re-integration of youth into society; financial literacy; before-school and after-school programs; community economic development; assistance for veterans; and health and wellness.
  •       The bill requires that the CNCS gives priority to disadvantaged youth and retired adults.
  •       The bill increases the minimum “stipend” that participants can receive from $100 per month to $125 per month, and the maximum from $125 per month to $150 per month.  Furthermore, the bill would increase the stipends for “experienced participants” from $200 per month to $250 per month. 

 

Authorization of Appropriations for VISTA: The bill would authorize $100 million for FY2010 and such sums as may be necessary for each of FY2011 through FY2014.  The FY2009 appropriation for this program is $96.1 million.

 

National Senior Service Corps

  •       The bill would remove the requirement that participants be 60 or older.
  •       The bill prioritizes projects utilizing retired professionals in science, technology, engineering, math, retired health care professionals, retired criminal justice professionals to prevent disadvantaged youth from joining gangs, and retired military and emergency professionals to improve public safety. 

 

Foster Grandparent Program

  •       The bill lowers the age of eligibility from 60 to 55.
  •       The bill sets the stipend ceiling for participants at 75 percent of the minimum wage.
  •       H.R. 1388 also alters the definition of “low-income person” from one living at 125 percent above the poverty line to 200 percent above the poverty line.  In addition, low-income participants receive priority. 
  •       The bill would allow for a 10 percent increase in the stipend for experienced participants.

 

Senior Companion Programs

    

  •   The bill would allow participants to receive a stipend.

 

Administrative Provisions

     

  • The bill requires that the Corporation demonstrate innovative activities when making grants to organizations.

 

Additional Background on AmeriCorps:  In the past, some RSC Members have suggested that funding for the National and Community Service Act be eliminated from the budget.  According to this RSC report, AmeriCorps, which receives the bulk of the funding under the Act, is an inefficient and expensive way of assisting individuals to pay for college by stretching the notion of what constitutes a “volunteer.”  In addition, AmeriCorps is not means-tested.  As a result, children of wealthy people can edge out low-income children for participation. 

 

According to the AmeriCorps website, the following questions address the benefits that AmeriCorps “volunteers” receive:

 

Do I get paid?

For all AmeriCorps programs, members receive a modest living allowance, and some programs provide housing.  You may not save much money during your year of service, but most members find the living allowance to be adequate to cover their needs.  AmeriCorps members who complete a term of service also receive an AmeriCorps Education Award.

 

What if I’m out of school and not interested in the education award?  Can I get that money in cash?

If you’re part of AmeriCorps*VISTA, you may opt for a cash payment of $100 per month of service instead of the education award.  All other AmeriCorps members are eligible only for the education award.

 

Can I defer student loans during my service with AmeriCorps?

You may qualify for postponement, or forbearance, of the repayment of your loans during your service.  The education award will help you pay off qualified student loans when you’re finished.  Contact your lender for more specific information or to confirm your loan status during AmeriCorps service.

 

What are the benefits of serving with AmeriCorps*NCCC?

AmeriCorps*NCCC members receive a living allowance of approximately $4,000 for the 10 months of service (about $200 every two weeks before taxes), housing, meals, limited medical benefits, up to $400 a month for childcare, if necessary, member uniforms, and an education award of $4,725 upon successful completion of the program.

 

What do the medical benefits cover?

The medical benefits plan covers all injuries and/or illnesses suffered during service and most pharmacy needs.  The plan does not cover medical care for pre-existing medical illnesses and/or injuries.

 

Can I bring my child/children with me to the campus?

Children are not permitted to live with members at the campus.  AmeriCorps*NCCC members with children must make arrangements for someone to care for their child/children while they are in the program.  Members that have custody of their children are eligible for up to $400 per month to help pay for child care while they serve with the program.

 

Furthermore, the following questionable programs have been funded by AmeriCorps in the past:

State

City

Program Name

Funded Through

Wyoming

Cheyenne

Wyoming Legal Services

AmeriCorps * VISTA

Washington

Seattle

Planned Parenthood of Western Washington

AmeriCorps * VISTA

Washington

Tacoma

Planned Parenthood of Western Washington

AmeriCorps * VISTA

Ohio

Columbus

Legal Aid Ex-Offenders Re-entry Project

AmeriCorps * VISTA

Ohio

Marion

Legal Aid Ex-Offenders Re-entry Project

AmeriCorps * VISTA

New York

Rochester

Legal Assistance of Western New York

AmeriCorps * VISTA

New York

Geneva

Access to Justice Project

AmeriCorps * State

Montana

Miles City

Montana Legal Services Association

AmeriCorps* VISTA

Montana

Missoula

Montana Legal Services Association

AmeriCorps* VISTA

Montana

Polson

Montana Legal Services Association

AmeriCorps* VISTA

Montana

Helena

Montana Legal Services Association

AmeriCorps* VISTA

Montana

Helena

Montana PBLC

AmeriCorps* National

Montana

Kalispell

Montana Legal Services Association

AmeriCorps* VISTA

Montana

Livingston

Montana Legal Services Association

AmeriCorps*VISTA

Montana

Anaconda

Montana Legal Services Association

AmeriCorps*VISTA

Montana

Billings

Montana Legal Services Association

AmeriCorps* VISTA

Montana

Bozeman

Montana Legal Services Association

AmeriCorps*VISTA

Montana

Great Falls

Montana Legal Services Association

AmeriCorps*VISTA

Montana

Red Lodge

Montana Legal Services Association

AmeriCorps* VISTA

Montana

Ronan

Montana Legal Services Association

AmeriCorps*VISTA

Missouri

St. Joesph

Students Taking Action Against Drugs

AmeriCorps* State

Minnesota

St. Paul

LawHelpMN

AmeriCorps* VISTA

Iowa

Honolulu

Project Laulima

AmeriCorps*State

Illinois

Des Moines

Iowa Legal Aid AmeriCorps Project

AmeriCorps*State

Hawaii

Chicago

Legal Assistance Foundation of Metropilitan

AmeriCorps* VISTA

Colorado

Johnstown

Wyoming Legal Services

AmeriCorps* VISTA

Alaska

Juneau

Risk Reduction for Juneau Youth

AmeriCorps* VISTA

Alabama

Anniston

Legal Services Alabama

AmeriCorps* VISTA

Alabama

Birmingham

Legal Services Alabama

AmeriCorps*VISTA

Alabama

Dothan

Legal Services Alabama

AmeriCorps*VISTA

Alabama

Florence

Legal Services Alabama

AmeriCorps*VISTA

Alabama

Mobile

Legal Services Alabama

AmeriCorps*VISTA

Source: http://americorps.gov/Default.asp

Many of the programs reauthorized and expanded in H.R. 1388 are ineffective and inefficient.  ExpectMore.gov, a website developed by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, with the goal to assess the performance of every Federal program in order to hold programs accountable for improvement, has audited these programs.  According to ExpectMore.gov, the programs included in H.R. 1388 have been audited as follows:

 

Learn and Serve:  Not Performing; Results Not Demonstrated

AmeriCorps National Civilian Community Corps: Not performing; Ineffective

AmeriCorps State and National Grants:  Performing; Adequate

AmeriCorps Volunteers in Service to America:  Performing; Adequate

Conservative Concerns:  Many conservatives are concerned that H.R. 1388 would expand and authorize programs that have been audited and considered ineffective by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (see above).  In addition, many conservatives may be concerned with AmeriCorps history of funding projects that some conservatives find objectionable (ex. Planned Parenthood of Western Washington).  Along with Planned Parenthood of Washington, the Los Angeles Gay and Lesbian Center (LAGLC) has received funding from AmeriCorps as well.  According to this article, published in 2000, the LAGLC was given AmeriCorps funding to go into schools and prevent “anti-gay” bias:

The Los Angeles Gay and Lesbian Center (LAGLC), the nation’s largest gay rights organization, has received more than $200,000 in support from AmeriCorps. The LAGLC AmeriCorps program is “focusing on society’s last ‘acceptable’prejudice: anti-gay bias,” according to a LAGLC program update. AmeriCorps members distributed a survey in L.A. schools that implied that students should report to school authorities any time they heard any student make a derogatory comment to any other student. An example of anti-gay bias that Gwen Baldwin, the LAGLC executive director, offered was “one person not being invited to a lunch table.”

According to a Heritage Foundation report from 2002,

… AmeriCorps participants should be prohibited from working for programs that promote abortion or refer individuals to abortion providers.  The Delaware chapter of Planned Parenthood, for instance, currently advertises its AmeriCorps grant for 20 participants “to provide human sexuality education and referrals for services to teens and their parents.”

According to an annual report from Planned Parenthood of Houston and Southeast Texas (PPHSET),

In 2000-2001 PPHSET initiated the Planned Parenthood Sex Education Team (PPHset), which was comprised of six Americorps youth. This creative group developed program performances featuring dance, music and drama to educate peers in 42 schools in Houston and southeast Texas.

Not only are many potentially contentious organizations receiving funds through AmeriCorps, many of these organizations are double, and triple dipping at the federal “trough”.  For example, AmeriCorps funds numerous legal services organizations (see above) who may already be receiving funds under the Legal Services Corporation Act (42 U.S.C. Sect. 2996).  Some conservatives may be concerned that this is an egregious example of wasteful government spending.   

Furthermore, many conservatives may not agree that individuals who are paid monthly stipends, compensated for living expenses, and granted healthcare benefits should be classified as volunteers—AmeriCorps indentifies their participants as volunteers.

Some conservatives may also be concerned that a notable provision included in Congressman Hoekstra’s bill, the Citizen Service Act of 2002 (H.R. 4854) was left out of H.R. 1388.  This provision would have ensured that AmeriCorps funding is not used to operate programs directed at youth that are designed to promote or encourage sexual activity; to distribute obscene materials to minors on school grounds; to provide sex education that is not age appropriate and excludes discussion of abstinence; to provide HIV-prevention instruction that is not age appropriate and excludes discussion of abstinence or the risks of HPV; or to operate a program of contraceptive distribution in schools.  As was previously noted, AmeriCorps funding has been used for sex education programs, including programs put on by Planned Parenthood.  Some conservatives may be concerned that this provision, that would have provided a safeguard against activities that many parents deem inappropriate for their children, was disregarded by the Majority.

Many conservatives may be concerned that the programs authorized and expanded in this bill reflect a big government response to local and community needs—instead of a more effective encouragement of community and individual response to such need. 

Finally, the Democrat Committee website states that H.R. 1388 “Grows the number of volunteers nationwide to 250,000, up from 75,000.”  While CBO has not scored H.R. 1388, it scored the bill last Congress as authorizing $6.2 billion over five years.  Using both that authorization level and the number of projected volunteers that this bill aims to produce, and assuming these numbers stay the same, RSC has estimated that the bill will provide $24,800 per volunteer.

Groups Opposing H.R. 1388:  Citizens Against Government Waste, Concerned Women for America, Eagle Forum, Family Research Council, National Taxpayers Union, Focus on the Family

 

Committee Action:  H.R. 1388 was introduced on March 9, 2009, and referred to the Committee on Education and Labor.  On March 16, 2009, the Committee held a mark-up and ordered the bill reported, as amended, by a vote of 34-3.    

 

Administration Position:  No Statement of Administration Policy was available at press time.

 

Cost to Taxpayers:  No CBO score was available at press time.  However, in the 110th Congress, according to CBO, H.R. 2857 would authorize appropriations of about $1 billion for fiscal year 2008.  CBO estimates that authorizations under H.R. 2857 would total $6.2 billion over the 2008-2012 period for grants and other activities, including education awards for participants in national service activities. 

 

Does the Bill Expand the Size and Scope of the Federal Government?  Yes, the bill creates new programs under the National Community Service Act of 1990, increases authorizations, and expands the authority of such programs. 

 

Does the Bill Contain Any New State-Government, Local-Government, or Private-Sector Mandates?  No.  

 

Does the Bill Comply with House Rules Regarding Earmarks/Limited Tax Benefits/Limited Tariff Benefits?:  The Committee on Education and Labor, in House Report 111-37, asserts that, “H.R. 1388 does not contain any congressional earmarks, limited tax benefits, or limited tariff benefits as defined in clauses 9(d), 9(e) or 9(f) of rule XXI of the House of Representatives.”

 

Constitutional Authority:  The Committee on Education and Labor, in House Report 111-37, cites constitutional authority in Article I, section 8, clause I of the U.S. Constitution.

 

RSC Staff Contact:  Natalie Farr; natalie.farr@mail.house.gov; 202-226-0718.

 

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